United Theological Seminary

Events Calendar

What’s happening on campus?

2020 Alum Max Brumberg-Kraus will present a part 2 on theopoetics, focusing on their current work with Drag Theopoetics.  Brumberg-Kraus is the co-founder of the House of Larva Drag Co-operative, an artist connector with ARC, as well as a local twin cities poet, playwright, and educator.
WHAT IS DRAG THEOPOETICS?
A “drag theopoetic” is the theopoetic of the professional or amateur crossdresser who performs in front or with an audience. It is experiencing the divine while being in drag. It is the sacred phenomenon of attending a drag show. Drag theopoetics is camping the gods. It is the production of another gender or a heightened version of one’s own gender as a means to understand God, the cosmos, and one another. Drag Theopoetics is the sacred rite of gesturing, performing, then becoming a self.

With the trial of Derek Chauvin beginning on March 8th, our nation – and especially the Twin Cities – will again be confronted with the trauma of racism, police brutality, and white supremacy in America. Our communities will face the images of George Floyd’s death yet again, long once more for justice, and experience emotions ranging from rage to hope. In anticipation of this moment, we gather to address important questions such as: How can communities of color respond in the midst of the images and issues that will be circulated during the trial? What role should clergy and community leaders play in providing care and critical consciousness raising in this moment? How can public conversations among faith leaders of all races disrupt systems of oppression and empower us to break these cycles of violence? Event details and registration here.

Members of the United community are invited to join The Ministry Lab’s Midweek Retreat every Wednesday at 12:00 p.m. CST. Take a half an hour each week to be present with God, your Self, and others. Develop your personal practice and discover how deepened awareness and greater emotional and spiritual balance enable you to engage more fully, creatively and energetically in the essential work of God’s Beloved Community. To learn more or to get on the weekly reminder email, contact Rev. Emily Meyer:ministrylab@unitedseminary.edu.

FriMar 0 5

PAGANS UNITED

The United Pagans group seeks to facilitate mutual support and conversation between students who are under the broad umbrella of Neopaganism (i.e., Pagans, Heathens, Wiccans, Druids, etc.). We also foster a space for sharing ritual notes, ideas about chaplaincy, and interfaith engagement. While our focus is on Neopaganism, we also welcome any United student who is Pagan-friendly/curious/adjacent.

This hybrid week, take a break from your work and join us for a night of connection and storytelling! There’s no need to have a story prepared beforehand — attendees will learn about the storytelling process and have the opportunity to workshop stories in small groups with the option of sharing them at the end of the evening. Lead by the effervescent Alaina Hoffman!

AfriCOBRA (a-FREE-co-bruh) – a new conciousness, sprouting in the late 1960s to identify international dimensions of Africanism in art and find aesthetic principles forged from the Black value system and rooted in spiritual ties to Africa. (Wadsworth A Jarrell, AfriCOBRA, Experimental Art Toward a School of Thought 2020)

Suzanne Roberts, local art historian and lecturer of African American artists, will be sharing with us about the history and resurgence of the AfriCOBRA movement in recent times, using CoolAde color and other techniques to consciously subscribe a non-western approach to art.

*Image is a detail from Bisa Butler, I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings, 2019, quilt.

Members of the United community are invited to join The Ministry Lab’s Midweek Retreat every Wednesday at 12:00 p.m. CST. Take a half an hour each week to be present with God, your Self, and others. Develop your personal practice and discover how deepened awareness and greater emotional and spiritual balance enable you to engage more fully, creatively and energetically in the essential work of God’s Beloved Community. To learn more or to get on the weekly reminder email, contact Rev. Emily Meyer:ministrylab@unitedseminary.edu.

This is a student-led space for UCC/DoC students to come together for fellowship and support as we navigate our seminary journey. The hope is to also provide “Mock Ecclesiastical Councils” for students or alums who are approaching their own Ecclesiastical Councils. Participation by those UCC/DoC students who are discerning their ministries or at early stages in their ordination journeys is encouraged!

Please contact LaTayna Purnell for more details atlatayna.purnell@unitedseminary.edu.

Meet with entrepreneurial ministers, chaplains and community leaders from around the country who are creating responsive synergistic ministries in a variety of contexts. For the past few sessions we have been exploring the creative challenges of bring people “back together” in community when the pandemic ends. What challenges will we face as faith leaders? Join us as we increase our creative capacity, idea‐making. Let’s take a design sprint into our call to care.

March 13-14, 2021, United is honored to join with The Center for LGBTQ and Gender Studies in Religion’s African-American Roundtable to host the seventh Souls A’ Fire Conference focused on the next generation of Black Queer Theology.  We are continuing the rich tradition of encouraging young scholars in their current work as well as learning from seasoned theologians and preachers as they explore the intersections of African-American culture, the church and LGBTQ identity.  It also promises to be a time of retreat and inspiration through ritual, praise, and worship. United student Sam Carwyn will be one of the presenters. Saturday’s program will run from 11 am – 4 pm CT; Sunday’s worship will begin at 10 am CT. All are welcome; registration is free of charge. More information and registration are available at http://soulsafire.org/.

Having conversations with working chaplains can be an invaluable opportunity to find out about what is happening in the profession. There are important trends to pay attention to as chaplaincy is facing important challenges and revisions. Make connections between theory and practice.. Additional conversations will include board certification competencies, professional organization memberships and current research. This month meet chaplains working in social justice and protest movements.

Over a century ago, Swedish artist Hilma af Klint received a commission from a spirit to translate a “secret growing” of spiritual truths about humanity through her art. Regarded as a “crazy witch,” she perhaps wisely willed these works to be kept secret until 20 years after her death. As the art world is being turned on its head by how her fantastical, visionary work disrupts art history’s narrative, we will see what might be revealed about her legacy–and our own callings and creativity–by looking at her story through a theological lens.

In this session, we will be playing some creative practices; bring paints–or any drawing/coloring medium–and paper!

*Portrait by Hilma af Klint, around 1900, via The Guggenheim Museum, New York (left); with Adulthood by Hilma af Klint, 1907, via Coeur & Art (right)

Members of the United community are invited to join The Ministry Lab’s Midweek Retreat every Wednesday at 12:00 p.m. CST. Take a half an hour each week to be present with God, your Self, and others. Develop your personal practice and discover how deepened awareness and greater emotional and spiritual balance enable you to engage more fully, creatively and energetically in the essential work of God’s Beloved Community. To learn more or to get on the weekly reminder email, contact Rev. Emily Meyer:ministrylab@unitedseminary.edu.

WedMar 1 7

BIPOC GROUP

BIPOC folks need a place of respite to share, renew and celebrate our resilience and lament. Come with a question,, come share a poem, a song, a prayer, as the spirit moves you. Safe space for strength and survival in community. These gatherings are for those who identify as BIPOC ONLY

Facilitated by Rev. Karen Hutt

MNIPL will also be leading a conversation about the Line 3 Pipeline as part of ST1001: Leadership and Strategies for Social Transformation on Thursday, March 18 at 6 pm. Everyone is invited to join the class for that presentation.

Please see Justin Sabia-Tanis for additional information.

United Pagans cordially invites the UTS community to the Spring Equinox ritual, Wishing on Ostara, to welcome the light of Spring and celebrate hope in the season of rebirth and emergent growth. Please wear something bright and bring a candle to light, as well as an (optional) sparkling beverage of your choice to toast with. While this ritual will be rooted in Pagan and nature-based spiritual practices, people of all faith traditions are welcome and encouraged to attend.

The phrase, “a good death” has become more and more prevalent in the public conversations around death and dying. But in many ways, that phrase creates a narrow focus that excludes issues of justice that are tightly woven into death as they are into life. The Radical Death Series, is a four-part series of conversations that will help widen our lens and broaden our scope when engaging in discussions around death and dying. Join us to discuss the inevitability of death, the denial of death, the “so-what’s”, and the “what’s next?” to close out the series with panelists Dr. Kami Fletcher, Angela Hennessy, and Ash Canty: Register Here. 

As part of our series for Womens History Month, musician, lgbtq+ health advocate, and guest artist Allison Jones will lead us in discussion and reflection on a number of songs by 1980s icon Kate Bush. Come for the music, stay for the contemplative reflection!

Members of the United community are invited to join The Ministry Lab’s Midweek Retreat every Wednesday at 12:00 p.m. CST. Take a half an hour each week to be present with God, your Self, and others. Develop your personal practice and discover how deepened awareness and greater emotional and spiritual balance enable you to engage more fully, creatively and energetically in the essential work of God’s Beloved Community. To learn more or to get on the weekly reminder email, contact Rev. Emily Meyer:ministrylab@unitedseminary.edu.

If you are in Social Transformation, Arts and Theology, chaplaincy or general ministry, at some point in the not too distant future you may be asked to write a grant to pursue innovative ideas or support existing programming. Learning about how to think about grant writing may be the furthest thing from your mind, but it is an essential skill for spiritual leaders. So many leaders say “I wished I learned a little about this in seminary!” Learn how to consider and procure grants from grant-making bodies. Learn how to develop relationships, conduct research, and present your ideas to make your grant successful.  This is a two part introductory session. Our presenter Liz Loeb is brilliant organizer and teacher and a friend of UTS.

Liz Loeb is a civil rights attorney and community organizer with deep roots in political and social movements for justice and liberation. A graduate of Brown University, Liz holds a law degree from NYU School of Law and a Ph.D in critical social theory from the NYU Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, Liz has over two decades of experience in fundraising, grant-writing, and in community-based resource models. Liz is the former Co-Director of the Kaleo Center for Faith, Justice, and Social Transformation and the current Associate Director of Minnesota Interfaith Power & Light.

The Stations of the Cross is a Catholic devotion that commemorates fourteen images or stations from the last day of Jesus’ life. Participants meditate on each station and may recite specific prayers. As a processional liturgy—whether contained within a church or displayed in yards in a neighborhood—the Stations of the Cross is a kind of miniature pilgrimage in which the faithful engage in embodied meditation on the Passion of Jesus. Because of the pandemic, our liturgy will be virtual for the second year in a row. United students and alumni of many religious traditions have contributed original artwork to the virtual exhibit.
These works will be discussed at the following Arts Lunch on Tuesday March 30th at 12pm-1pm CST (same zoom) and some of the artists will be in attendance to share their work.

Please contact LaTayna Purnell for more details atlatayna.purnell@unitedseminary.edu.

As part of our series for Women’s History Month, Allison Jones will present on 1980s icon Kate Bush. In this presentation, we will listen deeply to a number of Bush’s songs, then approach them through exegesis. Come for the tunes, stay for the contemplative and theological reflection!

Allison Jones is a community partner and friend of United who has participated in numerous events and programming at the seminary, including Arts Lunch, Social Transformation events, and Queertopia United. She is a long time musician and emerging artist with a passion for social justice, education, and public health. She currently works in the education department at JustUs Health in Saint Paul.

Members of the United community are invited to join The Ministry Lab’s Midweek Retreat every Wednesday at 12:00 p.m. CST. Take a half an hour each week to be present with God, your Self, and others. Develop your personal practice and discover how deepened awareness and greater emotional and spiritual balance enable you to engage more fully, creatively and energetically in the essential work of God’s Beloved Community. To learn more or to get on the weekly reminder email, contact Rev. Emily Meyer:ministrylab@unitedseminary.edu.

If you are in Social Transformation, Arts and Theology, chaplaincy or general ministry, at some point in the not too distant future you may be asked to write a grant to pursue innovative ideas or support existing programming. Learning about how to think about grant writing may be the furthest thing from your mind, but it is an essential skill for spiritual leaders. So many leaders say “I wished I learned a little about this in seminary!” Learn how to consider and procure grants from grant-making bodies. Learn how to develop relationships, conduct research, and present your ideas to make your grant successful.  This is a two part introductory session. Our presenter Liz Loeb is brilliant organizer and teacher and a friend of UTS.

Liz Loeb is a civil rights attorney and community organizer with deep roots in political and social movements for justice and liberation. A graduate of Brown University, Liz holds a law degree from NYU School of Law and a Ph.D in critical social theory from the NYU Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, Liz has over two decades of experience in fundraising, grant-writing, and in community-based resource models. Liz is the former Co-Director of the Kaleo Center for Faith, Justice, and Social Transformation and the current Associate Director of Minnesota Interfaith Power & Light.