Home

Welcome!
Become a Student
Visit, Apply, FAQ
Academics
Courses, Degrees, Faculty
Community Programming
Convocation, Lectures, Workshops
Institute for the Support
of Pastoral Ministries

Religion & the Arts
Exhibitions, Summer Institute, Degrees, Resources

Center for Public Ministry
Center for Interfaith & Intercultural Initiatives
Churches & Clergy
Staff and Faculty Appearances, Speaker's Bureau, Host an Intern
Alumni
For Students, Faculty,
Staff

Moodle, Student Directory

Course Descriptions — Churches’ Leadership
Courses are for 3 credits unless otherwise noted.

CL330 Worship of the Church
Faculty

This is the beginning survey course in worship and liturgical basics. The course explores the meaning of worship within differing ethnic contexts, the theological commitments behind liturgy and the structure of worship using the transposition of scriptural texts. We examine liturgical history, emancipatory liturgical language, sacraments, weddings, funerals and other aspects of worship practice. Students will learn to access worship resources, write liturgies and survey different denominational and cultural styles of worship.
Prerequisite: IS151. Required course for M
.Div., M.A.R.L., and Theology and the Arts

CL331 Worship Theory and Practice in the UUA
Faculty
Worship is the unique function of the church and the heart of congregational life, as well as a vitalizing center for the individual’s religious journey. This course will explore how worship may be understood in a theologically pluralistic context and how its elements may be handled competently, creatively and responsibly. Students will consider rites of passage and worship for all ages, as well as the more traditional Sunday morning service with preaching.
No prerequisites

CL335 Preaching in a Unitarian Universalist Voice
Faculty
This course looks at preaching within the context, primarily, of Unitarian Universalist worship. The course will consider the context, construction and delivery of sermons and explore such questions as, “What is the sermon for?” “With what authority does the preacher speak and with accountability to whom? To what?” Guest presenters will share their experience as writers and preachers of sermons from a variety of theological perspectives in a variety of settings. Students will be required to write and deliver three sermons.
No prerequisites

CL336 Preaching
Christine Smith
Preaching is an act of religious and theological interpretation and naming. It nurtures, sustains and transforms religious communities. This course will give attention to preaching as an act of ministry in the context of worship. We will examine the content and theology of sermons, the presence and leadership of the preacher and the centrality and authority of biblical texts. Preachers will share sermons in class, examine the social dimensions of preaching, explore a variety of sermonic forms and designs and develop concrete strategies to engage whole religious communities in the work of proclamation.
Prerequisites: IS151, CH161, CH261. Required course for M.Div., M.A.R.L.


Academics

Faculty
Spencer Library
Master of Divinity
Master of Arts
Master of Arts in    Religious Leadership
Doctor of Ministry
Certificate Programs

Diploma
Course Descriptions
Taking Courses
Auditing Courses
Internships
Online Bookstore

 

Contact Information

Brian Braskich
Interim Director of Admissions

Please call the admissions office at 651.255.6170 with any questions.

CL338 Advanced Preaching Seminar
Christine Smith
In the past three decades, the theory and art of preaching has been changing dramatically. Preaching has shifted from an event that says something, conveys something and articulates something, to an event that evokes something, does something and immerses the congregation in an experience. In this seminar, preachers will have the opportunity to experiment with sermonic form and style, preach at least three times in the presence of colleagues and identify and address critical issues of concern and places of needed growth in her/his own preaching style and ministry.
Prerequisite: CL336

CL345 Pottery and Proclamation
Christine Smith
The ongoing spiritual life of the preacher is of critical concern in a preaching ministry that stays vital, passionate and relevant. Working with clay can directly enhance and deepen our spiritual lives and nurture a different worldview. In this course we will explore various religious themes and spiritual practices that emerge as religious leaders learn the basic skills of the potter’s craft. Students will actually learn the skills involved in a basic wheel course: fundamental techniques of throwing basic forms on the potter’s wheel, the process of creating surface decoration using glazes and some applied elements and basic firing procedures.
No prerequisites

CL347 Celebrating and Proclaiming Resurrection
Christine Smith
Resurrection is at the center of Christian life and faith. It is about God’s enduring, uncompromising power of life and our response to that passionate life. Preachers will look at the power and possibility of resurrection life in our world today. Four questions will shape the content of the course: What kind of spiritual and homiletic disciplines might move preachers closer to resurrection life? How might we resist the crucifixions that threaten to silence or defeat resurrection life? How can we re-image the nature and activity of resurrection life from the perspective of the oppressed? How can we recover the radical nature of the gospel narratives in our quest for, and commitment to, this resurrection life? Sermons will be preached in class.
Prerequisite: CL336

CL351 Preaching toward Social Transformation
Christine Smith
This course will enable preachers to develop effective homiletical skills and strategies for preaching toward social transformation. It is for preachers who want to shape new maps for living and preaching that will engage congregations in issues of oppression, injustice and radical cultural change. This course will explore what the preacher can learn about justice and change from the innovative cultural ministries of the emerging and emergent communities and church movements that exist nationally and internationally. The course will challenge preachers to examine their own social locations, offer tools to deepen and expand skills in analyzing social systemic injustices and challenge preachers to deepened deconstructive and constructive theological thinking that undergirds a prophetic preaching ministry. Sermons will be preached in class.
Prerequisite: CL336.
Justice & Peace Studies elective

CL364 Media, Culture and Worship
Faculty
The primary text of this course will be the daily media coverage of local and world political and cultural events. Students will learn to locate a multitude of news sources from around the world, gaining a fuller, culturally conscious perspective on particular events. Given daily events, students will reflect on these events from critical, theological perspectives. The task is for students to bring the events of the world into worship with liturgical, pastoral and theological integrity. This is not a course on how to turn worship into a political forum. Rather, this course will explore how worship can proclaim the Word of God amid current events vis-à-vis media’s representations.
No prerequisites

CL440 Foundations of Christian Education
Barbara Anne Keely
This course explores the theories and practices of Christian Education, including theological frameworks, faith formations, teaching methods and models, curricular materials and the planning and leadership of educational programming. Particular emphasis is paid to the spiritual life of the congregation.
No prerequisites. Required course for M.Div., M.A.R.L.

CL442 Ministries with Children and Families
Barbara Anne Keely
This course explores theological, spiritual and practical approaches to ministry with children and families with children, including teaching methods, curricular resources, intergenerational and broadly graded educational ministries, parenting and child advocacy. Particular attention is paid to the spiritual life of the child.
No prerequisites

CL447 Ministries with Youth
Barbara Anne Keely
Adolescence is a critical time of claiming one’s own identity and faith commitment. This course is an overview of the church’s ministries with youth, including theological, spiritual, cultural, developmental, theoretical and practical aspects. Primary attention is given to the spiritual life of youth and the culture in which youth are thrust and/or create.
No prerequisites

CL470 Teaching the Bible in the Church
Barbara Anne Keely
The Bible is the core text for teaching in the Christian church. The purpose of this course is to introduce students to a variety of methods and models of teaching the Bible to children, youth and adults. Opportunities to teach the Bible permeate the life of the church, including worship and education. This course will address these areas and also will invite students to explore ways to integrate effective teaching of the Bible throughout church life.
Prerequisite: One seminary-level course in biblical studies

CL481 Spiritual Life of the Congregation
Barbara Anne Keely
The spiritual life of the congregation will be explored, including children, youth and adults. The course will also examine the spiritual life of the pastor and church leadership, both personally and how it shapes their vocations. The course project is an in-depth analysis of the spiritual life of a single congregation.
No prerequisites

CL482 Nurturing Your Spiritual Life as a Religious Leader
Barbara Anne Keely and Martha Postlethwaite
The purpose of this course is to engage students in a variety of practices in spiritual life that will encourage a deepening of their relationship with God. Students will be encouraged to engage in spiritual disciplines that are both familiar and new, preparing them to nurture both their spiritual lives and the lives of others. Taught from a Christian perspective, this elective will include readings, presentations, discussions, papers and practices of spiritual disciplines. Through the use of primary texts and contemporary materials, the course will explore historical roots and current practices of the spiritual life within the Christian tradition. This J-term course will meet during the regular class schedule for the first two weeks. The third week of the course will consist of a two-day overnight retreat that will include guest presenters and student final presentations.
No prerequisites

CL483 Unitarian Universalist Religious Education
Faculty

Religious education from faith development to Religious Education philosophy, from children’s worship and curriculums to the nuts and bolts of running a Religious Education program.
No prerequisites

CL525 Multicultural Foundation for Helping and Healing Practices: Culture, Context, Communication, Leadership
Faculty
Multicultural foundation for helping and healing practices and religious education. Study and application of culture and intercultural communication theory and practices in support of helping and healing professions. Historical-political context underlying helping and healing practices with attention to socialization and racialization experiences of U.S. Indigenous Peoples, African Americans, Latinos, Asian Americans and European Americans. Applications to interracial dialogue, pastoral care, counseling, catechesis, small group facilitation and social organization in congregations. Instruction through dialogue circle approach. Development of cultural competence for helping and healing professions.
No prerequisites. Leadership Toward Racial Justice elective

CL540 Practicum on Antiracism Dialogue
Faculty

Provides facilitator training and supervised co-facilitation of Antiracism Study Dialogue Circles being held in various contexts.
Prerequisites: TR331, two of the electives for a certificate or concentration in Leadership Toward Racial Justice

CL541 Empowering Lay Leaders
Jean Morris Trumbauer

An emerging paradigm of church requires us to move beyond our view of members as “volunteers” or satisfaction with “maintaining church programs” and our reliance on “time and talent” forms to invite laity to ministry. Leaders of the church are challenged to re-envision the foundations and practice of sharing the ministry. This course explores a holistic approach to gifts-based ministry and the multiple components of a shared ministry system for today’s congregations.
No prerequisites. Justice & Peace Studies elective

CL549 Urban Social Justice Ministry
Gary Reierson
Examine how parishes and local agencies implement and support social outreach programs, including direct aid ministries such as homeless shelters, prison ministry and food pantries, as well as social justice initiatives that address systemic social, political and economic realities that affect housing, poverty, employment, education and health care. Class location: Center for Families of the Greater Minneapolis Council of Churches, 3333 N 4th St, Minneapolis (south side of Fellowship Missionary Baptist Church.)
No prerequisites. Justice & Peace Studies elective; Leadership Toward Racial Justice elective; Women's Studies elective

CL550 The Emergent Church Movement and New Ecclesiology
Faculty

For the past 15 years, the nascent Emergent Church Movement has been challenging many of the traditional conceptions of both "theology" and "church." Only very recently has literature on (and by) the movement become available for study. In a seminar setting, this course will critically investigate the movement, looking particularly at the ways that ecclesiology is being reshaped in non-denominational settings, and renegotiated in denominational settings. The class will include field trips to local emergent congregations and meetings with the leaders of those churches.
No prerequisites

CL556 Ministry and the Rural Church: A Travel Seminar on Changing Religious and Cultural Realities in Rural America
Faculty
Taught in conjunction with the Northland Partnership for Town and Country Ministry, the course examines key issues churches address in their ministries in small town and rural communities. A special focus of the course will be several immersion trips to rural communities to meet with church and community leaders.
No prerequisites

CL565 Unitarian Universalist Social Action
Faculty

What is the good news which Unitarian Universalists bring to the broken, hurting world in which we live, and how does the larger world continually reshape and redefine Unitarian Universalism? We will explore the intersections between social justice and Unitarian Universalism from many perspectives — theological, historic — as they are experienced in congregations and in the larger liberal/ progressive/prophetic religious movement. Topics covered will include: theology of liberal family values, Universalism for the 21st century, effective congregational activism, public ministry skills for religious leaders (media, advocacy, organizing, coalition building, partnerships, education), the UU Social Witness process, UUA and other resources for justice making. The course will ground participants in a living faith which is expressed through working towards well-being for all.
No prerequisites

CL571 Public Witness of Congregations
Faculty
This course will examine models for the church’s ministry within wider society. Attention of the course will focus on local and congregational levels of social engagement/disengagement as well as on wider denominational and ecumenical patterns of public witness. Particular models of congregational ministries will be analyzed as examples of public theology.
No prerequisites

CL580 Theology, Ministry and People with Developmental Disabilities
Faculty

There are many unique and challenging issues surrounding the lives of individuals with developmental disabilities and their families. As with all people, these issues involve personal faith and faith communities. Leaders of faith communities and spiritual guides need to be aware of the implications of disability in the lives of all people they support. This course introduces students to issues that confront people with developmental disabilities, their families and faith communities. Through lectures, assigned readings, conversations with advocates and self-advocates and active engagement, we will explore the multiple issues facing people with developmental disabilities and their loved ones. The course will specifically focus on the implications for ministry. Students will be challenged to think theologically about a variety of issues related to developmental disability including issues of embodiment, justice and inclusion.
No prerequisites

CL663 Clinical Pastoral Education (non-practicum)
Faculty
Clinical Pastoral Education (CPE) is a form of theological and pastoral care education usually (though not always) done in an institutional chaplaincy context. This 400-hour course involves pastoral care visitation, group supervision and interaction, one-on-one supervision with a certified CPE instructor and didactic presentations. The sites available for CPE are off campus and are certified through the Association for Clinical Pastoral Education. Application to CPE programs (both full-time and extended types) needs to occur well in advance of the actual dates for the unit. This is a separate application and enrollment process than for regular courses at United. Consultation with the CPE coordinator is essential for those planning to enroll in CPE.
No prerequisites

CL670 Introduction to Pastoral Care and Pastoral Theology
Trina Armstrong
Pastoral care is the art of ministry as it relates to the psychological and theological needs of persons and faith communities. In this introductory course, we will engage the ministry of pastoral care from a holistic-life-span approach. We will consider theories and theologies for intervening in situations of grief and loss, illness, trauma, birth, and the relational spectrum (cultivating relationships, marriage, and divorce). We will also briefly examine specific contexts and consider issues of oppression and injustice. Particular attention will be given to pastoral ethics, listening and communication skills Connections between theology, spirituality, and practice will be developed through discussion, film, verbatims, theological reflection, and role plays.
No prerequisites. Required course for M.Div., M.A.R.L.

CL678 Caring for Families and Relationships
Trina Armstrong
At every stage of life, family, spouses/partners and significant others are among our most formative and influential relationships. They present us with both joys and challenges. Pastoral caregivers are frequently called to ministry with couples and families seeking to enter relationships, resolve difficulties and improve their relationships. In this course, you will be introduced to various theories and you will develop the skills and techniques necessary to provide pastoral care and counseling to a diverse and broad range of marriages, families and relationships. This includes interviewing and gathering information and understanding the impact of your own relationships on your pastoral identity and approach. Throughout the course, the role of culture and religion will be considered in how we shape expectations in marriages, families and other important relationships.
Prerequisite: CL670. Pastoral Care elective

CL679 Pastoral Care in Grief and Loss
Trina Armstrong
One of the tasks of pastoral/spiritual care is to aid people during major life transitions and losses such as relationship loss (divorce and break-ups), illness and death. In this course, we will review the history, theory and purpose of pastoral care in the context of various types of losses. We will also explore cultural and interfaith theories of end-of-life issues and the role of ritual in grief and loss towards the goal of developing the foundational principles and skills necessary to compassionately serve individuals and families in churches, hospitals, hospice and nursing homes.
Prerequisite: CL670. Pastoral Care elective

CL680 Short Term Narrative Methods for Pastoral Counseling (Narrative Approaches to Pastoral Counseling)
Faculty
Religious leaders have consistently experienced a dilemma in terms of their pastoral counseling work. On the one hand, ministers have multiple roles and functions and are trained as generalists in ministry. They often feel poorly equipped to do pastoral counseling because it has been seen as a specialty in ministry. On the other hand, pastoral counseling is an integral aspect of ministry, a central dimension of nurture and empowerment in the church. Narrative counseling theory offers one way to resolve this dilemma by providing a short-term, well-boundaried, teachable and effective way to help people who are experiencing distress in their lives and relationships. In this class we will explore narrative theories and theologies of pastoral counseling so that churches can better claim this dimension of ministry.
Prerequisite: CL670

CL685 Short Term and Crisis Models of Pastoral Care
Trina Armstrong
As pastoral leaders, we often find ourselves beside people in crisis. Unfortunately we cannot plan for crisis because they are unexpected and unique. In this course we will use insights from theology, spirituality, and psychology to increase our readiness to provide short-term pastoral care for people in crisis.
No prerequisites

CL686 Pastoral Care and the Shattered Soul
Trina Armstrong
In this introductory course, we will examine the role of pastoral caregivers, faith communities and faith-based organizations for providing pastoral care in the aftermath of traumatic experience. We will explore relevant theories and theologies for understanding the spiritual, psychological and emotional impact, as well as coping responses, to interpersonal violence (sexual trauma, child abuse and domestic violence), historical-cultural trauma, intergenerational trauma, vicarious and witness trauma, crime-victim trauma and war trauma on individuals, families, cultures and communities. We will also focus on: the meaning and place of trauma-informed pastoral care and the nurturing of your pastoral caregiving skills to the traumatized, and we will explore response models and collaborative efforts between mental-health professionals, faith-based communities and other community organizations.
No prerequisites. Pastoral Care elective

CL894 Evangelism through the Arts
Cindi Beth Johnson
Students will be introduced to evangelism through a variety of faith traditions. They will then be asked to articulate their own theology of evangelism in conversation with their traditions. Students will learn how the arts can be a significant means for evangelism. A variety of church settings will be explored showing arts as an important tool for evangelism such as church galleries, drama, poetry, sacred art shows and other arts related events. Students will also visit congregations with arts outreach programs and learn how the arts provide a unique means for congregational growth.
No prerequisites

CL896 Theology and Practice of Stewardship
Faculty
The course addresses a wide range of issues related to the theology and practice of Christian stewardship. While considered within the broader context of the whole ecology of stewardship, the course focuses on economic issues of money and exchange in human communities and their impact on human interaction, generosity and mercy. Students will develop a theology of stewardship and place it in the context of ministerial and congregational practice.
No prerequisites. Methodist Studies elective


United Theological Seminary of the Twin Cities, 3000 Fifth Street Northwest, New Brighton, Minnesota 55112-2598, USA 651.633.4311
©2002-2014 United Theological Seminary of the Twin Cities
Website Terms of Use
Tooltip content goes here.